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Thread: Caparison's Maple Fingerboard's

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Karifornia 'Murika
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    45
    I think a separate thread addressing this interesting issue would be best.

    I'm not an expert on wood work but working with sand paper isn't exactly rocket science if it isn't way too rough. if you start rough and then work your way to finner and finner grids of sand paper you will eliminate the all of the "scratches" you can see visually. By fine grids sand paper I mean up to 2000 and up. You will have to go to a hobby store for those things or just buy them online. if scratching the inlays and the binding is too much of a risk for you then you can just mask them with masking tape.

    I have herd a lot about tru-oil but I'm not sure if it will stain the fingerboard and darken it. I think a spray can of clear coat might just do if you don't care about the feel? or would that not work? I have had clear coat go yellowish on me with time

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    South FL
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    229
    Tru-oil will darken the wood, but it won't be a drastic change. See this thread for examples:

    http://www.squier-talk.com/forum/tec...-oil-neck.html

    The more coats you apply, the darker it'll get. You can apply like two coats if you want to minimize the tint and maximize that "raw wood" feel. You'll probably have to sand down the neck and repeat the process more often, though. A hard finish like a clear poly will be the most durable finish. It'll keep the neck looking pristine many years and offer the most protection. However, it'll have that "finished" feel. I would recommend staying away from nitro, personally.

    Also, I'm not sure how you would get the grime off of the fretboard with the inlays taped up. The tape would lift when you go to sand the fretboard and just cause a huge mess.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Atherton, Australia
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    728
    Quote Originally Posted by Code001 View Post
    Well, knowing what grade of sandpaper to use and how to go about it is somewhat basic woodworking skills. By asking that question, I'm afraid you might not be skilled enough to pull it off at this point in time.

    http://www.lmii.com/oil-finishes
    Yeah I'm just a simple but honest plumber mate haha. If it ever gets to that point I'll just have to wait for my next trip outta town and get a luthier to do the tedious stuff. Unfortunately closest one is 850km away. Oh well. Ill just stick with the eraser and dunlop care kit for now.

    Thanks for the link too. It's great. Much obliged.
    Caparison Horus HGS Pro BlackModded Natural Finish

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    South FL
    Posts
    229
    No problem. Keep in mind that I'm not trying to prevent you from doing this, and I definitely don't mean to talk down to you or anything like that. I'm just trying to prevent you from possibly messing up your Caparison neck, and that's why I said practice on an old neck first -- preferably with inlays more intricate than simple dot inlays. Once you learn from that, you should be able to tackle your Caparison neck without much of a problem. Sanding the back of the neck and applying the finish is quite easy. It's the fretboard that you'll have to be careful around.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Karifornia 'Murika
    Posts
    45
    Quote Originally Posted by Staygrey92 View Post
    If it ever gets to that point I'll just have to wait for my next trip outta town and get a luthier to do the tedious stuff.
    Unless you really trust your luthier you should always discuss what you plan on doing with us so you can have some closure.


    This topic is so awsome >__< Code001, you are freaking awsome!!! I'm learning so much.

    Quote Originally Posted by Code001 View Post
    The more coats you apply, the darker it'll get. You can apply like two coats if you want to minimize the tint and maximize that "raw wood" feel. You'll probably have to sand down the neck and repeat the process more often, though.
    Ah I see, i that is probably the best course of action since you are not spraying the oil and it is then bound to be uneven when you apply it but wouldn't you have to remove all of the frets if you go that far?

    Quote Originally Posted by Code001 View Post
    A hard finish like a clear poly will be the most durable finish. It'll keep the neck looking pristine many years and offer the most protection. However, it'll have that "finished" feel. I would recommend staying away from nitro, personally.
    I came across this link just a while ago but it seems to be not that useful since there is already non yellowing Polyurethane coating
    I have never seen a nitro finish before but so far it is regarded as blasphemy by almost every guitarist I have seen because it never dries.

    Quote Originally Posted by Code001 View Post
    Also, I'm not sure how you would get the grime off of the fretboard with the inlays taped up. The tape would lift when you go to sand the fretboard and just cause a huge mess.
    I'm not sure either. I have tried it on scale models but never on my guitars/basses, it worked fine with hardly any mess on models but I guess it might not work on guitars. You don't exactly tape the whole fret but you take an exacto blade and cut the tape in the shape of the inlay then remove the excess masking tape.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Atherton, Australia
    Posts
    728
    Yeah I would hate myself if i ruined it! These capa's are too expensive for me to fiddle around with too much haha. I've got an old epiphone here which could be good practice.

    If anyone does get around to sanding their Capa fretboard and condition the neck .. would really appreciate some pics of how you went about it
    Caparison Horus HGS Pro BlackModded Natural Finish

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